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MSC hugely successful Tramping Series

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

Mike Daisley, CEO for the Mountain Safety Council chatted with us about their hugely successful tramping video series released in late October last year that has had over 400,000 views across the council’s social media and YouTube channels. The
'Mike Daisley, CEO for the Mountain Safety Council chatted with us about their hugely successful tramping video series released in late October last year that has had over 400,000 views across the council’s social media and YouTube channels. The videos are also embedded in the relevant DOC page for the track. The twelve-part series, made in partnership with a number of the Council’s partner organisations – notably DOC, LandSAR, Metservice, NZMGA, NZOIA, NZMGA and NZ Police – was developed to engage the various groups of people that recreate on certain tracks around New Zealand. “What we wanted to do was create a track-specific resource that gave the participant good advice on what things they should consider before and during their trip.” “Ultimately, we landed on a video series as the best medium to deliver these important messages. We felt that by keeping the video as engaging as possible we’d have a better chance of holding the interest of the viewer which would open an opportunity to discuss safety issues in a contextual way and framed as planning advice.” “We partnered with Quite Nice Films in Wellington and they delivered a great product that is rich with animated iconography, drone footage, 3D maps and point of view shots from the track itself. By approaching it this way the viewer can see exactly where the hazards are and has a visual reference for decision making points, for example.” The Council wanted to go one step further and try and measure what impact these videos were having on the participants. Daisley said “It’s not enough to measure views alone, we needed to demonstrate that the series was having an impact and changing people’s behaviours, and with Research New Zealand’s (RNZ) help, we’ve done so conclusively. This gives us the confidence to expand the series, which we intend on doing in the next few years; watch this space!” Emanuel Kalafatelis, Director, RNZ said that ““In my 35 year plus years’ experience, I have never ever seen behavioural results as strong as these that can be attributed to one single initiative. There is no doubt, that the videos have had a significant positive impact on trampers’ safety-related behaviour. And this is reflected in the fact that the ‘test’ group gave the safety video a ‘Net Promoter Score’ of 43.” – Emanuel Kalafatelis, Director Research NZ and Fellow of the Research Association of New Zealand (RANZ) The findings are due to be released sometime in August this year, but the Council let us have a sneak peek at some of the exciting findings. The ‘Net Promoter Score’ (NPS) is a measure used widely to establish how likely a person would be to share their experience with a product or service with their friends and family. Anything over a 30 (positive) is considered excellent, so for a safety video to achieve 43 (positive) is almost unheard of. With respect to the results from the research the MSC discovered that after watching the video – specific to the track the respondent was about to undertake – 85% said they understood the track better. 82% knew more about the hazards along the track and 78% said they now knew where the key places to make decisions were. After watching the video, a staggering 40% said they felt ‘even more’ prepared for their walk than they had been. Daisley said this was the kind of impact that they had been hoping for “We know a great deal about the places and people that are getting into trouble in the outdoors around the country, so it’s exciting for us to be able to get hyper-specific to a track to deliver the most contextual and relevant information to the participants.” “We’ve got a lot of people to thank for this one, but most importantly are our Council member organisations and partners. Without their continued and overwhelming support in the evidence-driven work that we do, the participant would in this case be back to trying to figure out the trip from a topo map or guide book. That’s fine for experienced people, but if, like thousands of people each year you’re new to the outdoors, it’s mostly an experience of figuring it out when you’re out there.” “If you’re able to see the terrain, as you are in the videos, then you suddenly can see why you’ll need more insulation layers than you’d thought, or why you might need ice axe and crampons for example.” “We’ve had several people get in touch after seeing the videos saying that they we’re so pleased they’d seen the track in advance because they realised it might have been out of their abilities at the time. Taranaki summit walk is a great example of this and has seen several serious incidents in the last decade from people underestimating the hazards and scale of that trip.” The series is available to view on the MSC’s YouTube and Facebook pages. If you’re heading into the outdoors you ought to give this series a watch, and make sure you send it to your friends that are getting into tramping. We all have a responsibility to keep each other safe out there, and there are few better resources to get your teeth into tramping than this series.'

Roadless

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

The Teton Wilderness is one of the largest tracts of protected land in the lower 48. Home to stunning mountain scenery, massive amounts of snow and the home of the Yellowstone Grizzly, the hand of man has left this treasure trove largely untouched.
'The Teton Wilderness is one of the largest tracts  of protected land in the lower 48. Home to stunning mountain scenery, massive amounts of snow and the home of the Yellowstone Grizzly, the hand of man has left this treasure trove largely untouched. In the winter of 2019, Bryan Iguchi teamed up with fellow snowboarders Jeremy Jones and Travis Rice to explore this untamed area on a 10-day human powered expedition, climbing and riding dozens of never-seen-before lines. In addition to our annual ski and snowboard production, follow this new mission in TGR’s latest snowboard film  Roadless , dropping Fall 2019.'

Back on the River

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

Being not far away from my 61st birthday, I thought my days of rafting customers on the Grade 5 section of the Rangitikei River were over. Recently, that has proved not to be the case. Winter is always when the older experienced senior guides come
'Being not far away from my 61st birthday, I thought my days of rafting customers on the Grade 5 section of the Rangitikei River were over. Recently, that has proved not to be the case. Winter is always when the older experienced senior guides come out of the woodwork. This winter is no exception. On any given day, between the four of us who generally guide during this period, there can be up to 97 years of river guiding experience. That is quite something. Over winter, it is also more of a family affair. There is me, father and grandfather, Janey the eldest daughter, Tom her husband, and long-time friend and fellow river guide Paul Eames. PaulE, as we know him, operates his own company in Mangaweka over the summer but gets up on the Grade 5 section in winter. Talking about family, on occasion, Max Sage, the junior of the bunch and my nephew, Janey’s cousin, is also on the river. I always had this idea that I would be finished with river guiding, especially on the Grade 5 section, by the time I was 55 years old. Circumstances and probably a reluctance to really let it go have proven this not to be the case. However, I am sure there does come a time, just not sure when that is. As I write this, it is almost mid-May. A storm went through last night that has cooled temperatures and put some much-needed moisture on to surrounding farmland. The river has also had a top up. In fact, due to high flows, at this stage, it is unlikely we will be rafting tomorrow. Other than a couple of other short-lived top-ups, we have had an extended period of unseasonal lower, almost summer-like flows, right through Autumn. These lower flows have been coupled with warmer temperatures and more settled weather than normal. Personally, and I would have to add what I observe from the majority of customers in this statement, I find lower flows are a huge amount of fun. Why? The Rangitikei River at any level is challenging. However, what I like at lower flows are a couple of things. First of all, the rapids are very technical. What being technical means is that there is a lot to do for both guide and crew. Much of the manoeuvring needs to be very precise, with the crew involved in both paddling and shifting their weight around the raft. The second thing I like about low water is that the consequences of getting it wrong are seldom so full on. If a raft flips, the current is a lot slower, meaning that people seldom go far, and as long as they keep their feet up are unlikely to encounter any harm. We also experience more minor wraps and swamps of the rafts, but for customers, these are often highlights of the trip! Rafting at these flows has suited me just fine. So, What Happens as You Get Older? What I have found is that age does not affect my ability to guide the raft. I am still strong enough and coordinated enough to, in general, put the raft where it needs to be. However, it is when something does not go to plan at higher water that age certainly catches up. It is a reality of life that as you age the mind may still be willing, but the body is not always up to the challenge. I cannot get on an overturned raft as quick as I once could, nor can I swim rapids with the same equanimity and composure as I once could. Where to From Here? I could say this will be my last season, at least on the Grade 5 section, but that might be making a rash statement. The Rangitikei River and I now have such a long relationship, going back over 40 years since my first trip and 33 years since I started guiding, that I am unlikely to ever truly finish our association. So, what does that mean? Expect me to still guide now and then at lower flowers, and probably be in a safety boat at higher flows. All the while both enjoying these special times on the water, but also wondering whether I should really still be there. And no doubt, I will still talk about retirement. Brian Megaw https://www.rivervalley.co.nz/back-on-the-river/'

Skin Deep

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

Words P.M. Fadden Photos Corey Anderson & P.M. Fadden   The questions collect like the snow underski. Is it stable? Will footing hold? Is fatal error a footstep away? Rubber legs and heaving chest encourage the crashing waves of self doubt. It’s
'Words P.M. Fadden Photos Corey Anderson & P.M. Fadden   The questions collect like the snow underski. Is it stable? Will footing hold? Is fatal error a footstep away? Rubber legs and heaving chest encourage the crashing waves of self doubt. It’s only fatigue playing tricks, but after a climb of 1500 meters it is the final push that feels impossible. Every ounce of experience and training is required. Deep, dragging inhalation quiets the roaring inside each ear. The route is sound, the summit near. Plant, and step. “They don’t call it a frontier for nothing guys.” Jared is studying a regional topo-map, pointing out the possible routes of ascent. He’s an AK local who doesn’t muck about when it comes to mountains. His words air aloud what the group had been silently thinking. Boasting seventeen of the highest peaks in North America while ranging 1.5 million square kilometers, Alaska is by far the U.S. nation’s largest state—twice the size of Texas—and a potentially lethal box on the bucket list. Steel-eyed armies of aspiring powder-pirates swarm Alaska’s commercial ski slopes from mid-September until late April. But for some that is only the beginning. Beyond that winter window, an especially brazen few tour to make real those turns otherwise relegated to imagination. Motivations include the lure of AK’s enormous ski acreage. Or some sense of personal conquest. But more, what drives is the knowledge that the Great Land’s snow panoply is really bound only by the limits of willpower. \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t Enter Chugach National Forest; a sprawling, gulf-shored wildlands considered among the top-three largest forests in the United States of America. Its mountainous ramparts, 30% percent of which is ice-locked, span an area 400 kilometers long by nearly 100 wide, rocketing from sea level to Mount Marcus Baker’s 4,000 meters in a mere 16 kilometers while bristling fourteen additional peaks surpassing 2,400 meters along the ascent. The wild-at-heart endearingly refers to the raw expanse as “Alaska’s backyard.” And dancing visions of horizon-spanning, chalk white spines drive the schemes of snow seekers specifically. “It’s worth it,” says Mikey, a co-companion on the up-coming trip and equally schooled in the demands of high-altitude endeavors. “Scoring the right day in the Chugach,” Mikey says, “could be the ski day of a lifetime.” This team has been carving these slopes for years. And optimism is high to reach about the target zone. Within the Chugach’s snow-swirled rabbit hole winds Turnagain Pass. The iconic sector is reachable within the hour from transit hub, Anchorage via Seward Highway. The largest commercial ski in Alaska, Alyeska Resort roosts 20 white-knuckle driving minutes distant. And the plug into Alaska’s roadways equates to convenient access. Thanks to its sea-level roots and 1,500 meter summits Turnagain is a near irresistible ski tour proving ground. In Alaska the term, off-piste ranges in meaning. Quirkily named zones, Eddie’s or Tin Can are favored as starter-level missions achievable within a day. While farther afield taller seams beckon with the lure of increased altitude-to-risk ratios. And to imagine itself self immersed in the near-arctic backcountry rightly spurs the spirit to soar and nerves to tingle. But there’s a hell of a lot to be done before the skiing starts. Preparation, as it must, is the first box to tick. And it begins at the planning stage. It is companions that the tone and, heaven forbid, come to the rescue. So a manageably numbered, knowledgeable crew gets the proverbial snowball rolling. For obvious reasons, going solo is ill-advised, but so too is joining a disorganized horde. Packs are checked, sorted then checked again. There will be no turning back for missing gear, and caught short of supplies could mean ‘abort mission,’ or worse. Naturally, ‘gear’ implies a dizzying array of field items, all of which are handy to carry. But the must-haves are the trusty tri-fecta: avalanche transceiver, probe, and shovel. When gone bush, these are of equal—or greater—import than the kit to slide down. Author’s note: save a pocket for a full flask. (summit is a fine setting for toasting) The heritage of ski touring is literally pre-historic. Its earliest depictions are in cave art form. Now, as then, the base of a ski (or Split) is set with “Skin” before being strapped to the foot. The coarse material creates friction, enabling traction, and allowing reasonably safe passage through otherwise completely inaccessible terrain. The Skin is later peeled as easily as it was applied and, minus its snow-magnetism, equipment is once again in slide formation. Even the single-plankers have climbed aboard for this ride. The Splitboard, or Split, is a recent cousin to the touring family, melding traditional snowboard and ski forms while retaining iconic surf-meets-skate counter culture. And anyway, at altitude, there exists no animosity over vehicle. There’s only the proof found in the pudding of use. All the gear and best laid plans are prepared with single purpose; eventuality. Leader among the list of backcountry happenstance is avalanche. It is a lurking predator which never sleeps. Avalanche activity is the result of much more than snow alone. Contributing factors include moisture content, wind, slope gradient, direct sun, snowfall history and more. Stakes in this game are high. The most effective defense is a one-two combination of education with preparation. No amount of either is too great. Final gear checks are complete. Jared starts the car. Mikey shuts the boot. The road to the pass waits. In transit, the wondrous layout of Turnagain Pass rises in relief. It’s difficult to tear the eye from the windows. Ascents look approachable as a leisurely stroll or laborious climb, speedy skin or long-day hike. Journeys here take many forms. In Alaska, routes of ascension are multi-use. Both the stout, post-holing bootpacker and the far more prevalent skinner are welcomed upon the trail. And all gather at Seward Highway’s roadside turnouts. From them, quiet trails depart to cross snowy drainages before rising into a quivering treeline. Climbs are gradual, airy, and well-marked. Typically, the passages will parallel flowing gorge water, barely visible through unbroken snow. It’s an effort not to be frozen in place by the views. Tracing near ridgelines or gazing back across valley floor is a stunning reaffirmation of the lore inherent to the Last Frontier.  The sloping topography is white-on-white. The air is knife’s edge cold. Steady climbing cuts around and through quiet groves of wind-shielded pines. Nowhere else is an ecosystem like this to be found. Fat scoops of snow cling to skinny tree boughs, bending double their tops. It’s a landscape straight from the pages of Dr. Seuss, and ski-able. Adrenaline is churning. Muscle power leaves the groves behind. Achieving a mid-height altitude, trees become scattered, vistas expanded, and options apparent. This is prime real estate for a snow pit. Much like a wartime foxhole, snow pits are simple holes revealing vital data. Etched upon a pit wall are tails of layering, climatic conditions, and susceptibility to movement. The information gleaned from the simple act of shoveling snow has saved more than one life. And it’s an immutable facet of every backcountry trip. Gullies unfurl below the still climbing party. They appear to the eye as side by side tree-runs leading to glory. Up slope, the treeless top reaches rise still further. This juncture is a kind of mountain nexus. Days marked by passing weather, low-visibility, or suspect snowpack might direct the party downward, to return to the trees. The clustered trunks provide defilade and decrease likelihood of avalanche. Clear skies or adventurous hearts, on the other hand, urge the line chasers ever-higher toward pitched faces that hide in plain sight. The sky is the limit in ski touring. Moving upward certainly affirms the notion. Slope incline becomes steady and, if anything, increasing. Wind is now a factor, as is altitude. Summit access seems so close, yet there’s mighty hiking to be done. Under-ridge bowls, more prominent than the summit itself, and locally anointed with wacky namesakes, are reached and surpassed. The previously gentle, cartoonish-ly pleasant topography of the lower mountain transforms into steeply angled faces. There is precious little comprise to the long, swooping snow lanes. Panorama here is set to maximum exposure. The final steps, previously fretted to be impossible now lie behind as little more than footprints through deep snow. The achievement is a rush, but good sense prevails in imparting that welcome should not be overstayed. In Alaska, weather (and light) shift surprisingly fast. “Avoid at all costs to be stuck in one, or lacking the other,” says Jared. The elements demand respect, that above all. Yet even the gnarliest weather can feel calm during summit moments. Simple motions of gear adjustment, shift in balance, or even calm breathe transfuse to be stitches in time. It is the cool, still center to a land characterized by loud silence. Thanks to planning, and a dash of good fortune, the downward zoom adheres to a pre-set path. Start, or ‘launch,’ is a location picked with care. The pre-determined line includes mid-mountain checkpoints. These act as muster stations for re-assessment of snow conditions or reassurance against the slow anguish of becoming lost. But it’s the spaces in-between that receive most lip-service, the surreal navigation; flow through a realm set to risk, and swooshing mute; a testament to the truth that in wild country, reward reflects effort. At Turnagain egress takes unique form. Narrow, imaginative alleyways snake through close–and closing–trees. Ultimately they return to where the trail first began, but in-between there’s ample opportunity for deviation. Like it or not, day closes with just as much hiking as when it began. And the turnouts of Seward Highway are farther still. But, in the wake of a successful climb and ski, the lengthy exit stroll feels somehow like red carpet bled to white. The day’s course has looped back upon itself and returned to its start; a place from which each ingredient has played a key role. Close friends have provided the company, knowledge plus skill have lit the way, and Alaska’s Turnagain Pass has laid the scene for a once in a lifetime experience attainable only along the Last Fr'

This is worth watching Knox Hammack 2015 Highlight Reel

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

2015 was the most incredible year of paddling for me so far. From Colombia, to the Northwest Territories I was able to paddle rivers I never thought I would be able to. Extra footage provided by Edward Muggridge, Trent McCrerey, Marleigh Poulsen,
'2015 was the most incredible year of paddling for me so far. From Colombia, to the Northwest Territories I was able to paddle rivers I never thought I would be able to. Extra footage provided by Edward Muggridge, Trent McCrerey, Marleigh Poulsen, Robert Waldron, Bren Orton, Abe Herrera, Zach Ruben, Marcelo Galizio, Josh Pecaric, James McCleod, Jared Seiler, and Micah Melkonian.'

RUAPEHU

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

RUAPEHU By Megan Prentice Although a year round destination Ruapehu definitely comes under highlight in the winter months. Located in the middle of the North Island, south of Lake Taupo, Ruapehu is known for its famous three mountains, Mt Ruapehu,
'RUAPEHU By Megan Prentice Although a year round destination Ruapehu definitely comes under highlight in the winter months. Located in the middle of the North Island, south of Lake Taupo, Ruapehu is known for its famous three mountains, Mt Ruapehu, Mt Tongariro and Mt Ngaruhoe and that is what most often draws people to this area. The mountains which had a starring role in the popular Lord of the Rings franchise do not disappoint when off the big screen. The surrounding landscape varies from untouched bushland and mesmerising waterfalls to the abundance of volcanic rock, and desert.  This area is filled with exciting outdoor adventure and the surrounding unique towns offer opportunities to explore. \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t For those wishing to make the most of the ski season you will find Taupo, Turangi, National Park Village, and Whakapapa Village closest to Whakapapa Ski Field and Ohakune closest to Turoa.   Whakapapa  The Whakapapa ski field is the largest ski field in New Zealand and is located on the Northern side of Mt Ruapehu. Whakapapa offers varying opportunity for breathtaking runs for all level of skiers with 25% beginners, 50% intermediate and 25% advanced terrain.   Whakapapa has a dedicated area for beginners with Happy Valley being a perfect training ground. Happy Valley offers learner conveyor lifts, a cafe, rental complex and a Ski school. There’s also a sledding area for parents and their children to enjoy when not wanting to carve up the snow.   Intermediate and Advanced skiers will also enjoy this ski field with more than 50 groomed runs to master, including bumps, chutes and drops. This ski field is perfect for everyone and will cater to varying skills levels in families and groups. An exciting edition to Whakapapa is the Sky Waka gondola, due to open June this year. The fifty Sky Waka gondola cabins will feature floor to ceiling glass for breath-taking views, internal ski racks, audio and lighting and individual leather seats offering business-class luxury to passengers befitting of the UNESCO Dual World Heritage status of Whakapapa Ski Area. Each cabin accommodates 10 passengers and even the tallest skiers will be able to stand upright in the cabin with more than 2m of internal clearance. The Sky Waka will run from the Top of the Bruce base area directly to the award-winning, newly refurbished Knoll Ridge Chalet. It will transport 2,400 people per hour over the 1.8km in approximately 5 minutes. The Sky Waka will be open 365 days of the year and open up a range of alpine experiences for all ages.  Sky Waka is wheelchair accessible too.   On the southern side of Mt Ruapehu, you will find Turoa ski field, with a split terrain of beginner 20%, intermediate 55% and advanced 25%. Turoa is home to the nation’s longest vertical drop at 722m. Their 6-seater chair lift, known as ‘High noon express’, will take you up to the highest lifted point in New Zealand. Alpine Meadow is perfect for beginners and offers a 120m long carpet lift. Intermediate and Advanced skiers will enjoy challenging natural terrain and amazing views.   Tukino ski field is situated on the eastern slopes of Mt Ruapehu, Tukino offers the chance to get away from the masses and commercial based fields. Tukino is a club operated field, so the sense of camaraderie and friendship is very apparent. Some say it imitates what skiing was like ‘back in the day’. If you’re a proficient skier (intermediate or advanced) with a passion for carving your own path and fueled by the sense of adventure. This ski field was made for you.   Activities off the slopes:  Wherever you are in this area of New Zealand, you’ll find something to do, from exploring on foot or by mountain bike to exploring the landscapes by rail cart or jetboat with Forgotten World Adventures in Taumaranui, there really is something for everyone.   One of the most popular and well-known activities in the area is the Tongariro crossing. The 19.4km hike takes you up the mountain and across the surrounding plateau but ask anyone who has done it and it is much more than just a hike. The landscape is breathtaking, as it varies from steaming vents to glacial valleys, ancient lava flows, all accompanied by stunning views. The walk gives an otherworldly feel and when completed you feel a real sense of accomplishment. This is an unforgettable experience. You are able to book accommodation and transport taking you to the start of the walk and picking you up at the end of it, making it an easy activity to experience.   Rafting on the Tongariro River is the best thing to do when the mountain is inclement or when you’ve just had enough of the snow. Two companies operate out of Turangi, Rafting New Zealand and Tongariro River Rafting and both offer a range of rafting options on the Tongariro, starting with a family grade 2 family fun day through to multi-day adventures and everything in between. The most popular trip is the grade 3 rafting experience that runs daily during winter and twice a day through the rest of the year. It offers over 60 white-water rapids, from the Poutu Intake to the takeout point approximately 14km downriver.  The scenery is spectacular, the water crystal clear and clean enough to drink and you’re likely to spot the native endangered blue ducks and plenty of trout. The rivers in the area; Tongariro, Whanganui, Waikato, and Whakapapa, become the centre for outdoor adventure activities.The area surrounding the river is home to many off road trails, which become perfect for mountain biking, long distance running, hiking and all round sightseeing. The variation between the different tracks surrounding the region means there is something for every type of adventurer. Any type of adventure your searching for exists here, The adventure your dreaming of exists here, and it’s versatile. Change your mind, change it again, you will still be accommodated for. So call up your friends and get going, what are you waiting for?! For the best information visit www.visitruapehu.com'

GoPro Hero 7 Black in your next adventure

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

Don’t forget to pack the GoPro Hero 7 Black in your next adventure. This GoPro camera operates with a touch display and has HyperSmooth video stabilization for improved image quality. This waterproof GoPro camera has voice control and has GPS,
'Don’t forget to pack the GoPro Hero 7 Black in your next adventure. This GoPro camera operates with a touch display and has HyperSmooth video stabilization for improved image quality. This waterproof GoPro camera has voice control and has GPS, enabling you to keep track of where your photo and video were captured. It has a time warping effect to create a simple fast-motion or slow-motion picture. With 12-megapixel photo resolution and 4K video resolution, it records your adrenaline-filled adventures with vibrant colours and vivid detail. 12-megapixel 4K60 Video + 12MP Photos Rugged + Waterproof Voice Control SuperPhoto TimeWarp Video Intuitive Touch Screen Face, Smile + Scene Detection Shoot Vertically 8x Slo-Mo Video With ultra-high frame rate 1080p240 video HyperSmooth Video Stabilization Manufacturer Warranty: 12 months check out the  video'

Serious adventure on a not so serious bike

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

If you’re looking for something unique to do on a motorbike then it doesn’t get much more exciting and unusual than the Monkey Run Peru. The Adventurists, which as their name suggests, are responsible for some of the world’s most exciting
'If you’re looking for something unique to do on a motorbike then it doesn’t get much more exciting and unusual than the Monkey Run Peru. The Adventurists, which as their name suggests, are responsible for some of the world’s most exciting adventures, ranging from The Mongol Derby (the world’s longest and most dangerous horse race) to the Icarus X (a paramotor race across southern Africa) are excited to announce the Monkey Run Peru is coming back for the second time this September. The adventure takes you through some of Peru’s most isolated areas, starting in Atalaya in the Amazon and finishing off in Ayacucho in the Andes the route travels some of Peru’s moist unspoilt and rarely visited parts of the Amazon rainforest. Three years ago they launched the Monkey Run, which saw participants dropped in the Sahara and tasked with crossing the Atlas Mountains and reaching the Moroccan coast on 50cc Monkey Bikes. After just the right mix of thrills, spills and camels, the success of the Moroccan Monkey Run led to the creation of the Monkey Run Peru which is asking place for the second time this September. The Adventurists are keen to show off the miniature bikes’ prowess on some of South Americas’ most exciting roads and trails, surrounded by epic vistas from Ayacucho in the Andes to Atalaya in the Amazon. The fact there is no set route isn’t a result of The Adventurists lacking a good road map, it’s at the heart of what they’re all about and they actively promote getting lost and heading off the beaten track. This drive for genuine adventure is why The Adventurists specifically chose Monkey Bikes ,  rather than more comfortable or powerful rides. “ Monkey Bikes are a whole lot of fun and it’s hard to take a serious fall. Because they’re low to the ground they also feel much faster than they are, but in reality they’re slow enough for you to truly appreciate the landscape you’re travelling through. They’re perfect for this trip and they’re bound to breakdown at some point, which means you’ll be forced to engage with the locals and find out what the country and culture is all about.”'

RED BULL DEFIANCE RETURNS TO WANAKA IN MARCH 2020

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

New Zealand’s most challenging two-day adventure race, Red Bull Defiance, is set to return to Wanaka next year with new event dates and a new solo racing category announced creating the ultimate multisport weekend in the stunning Southern Alps
'New Zealand’s most challenging two-day adventure race, Red Bull Defiance, is set to return to Wanaka next year with new event dates and a new solo racing category announced creating the ultimate multisport weekend in the stunning Southern Alps location.   Adventure racing athletes from around the world will be drawn to the outstanding natural beauty of Wanaka to take part in Red Bull Defiance being held on the 28 th and 29 th March 2020. 100% Pure Racing is the adventure racing company behind the event and CEO Warren Bates says national and international multi-sporters have whole heartedly embraced the event. “Wanaka is the perfect adventure playground for Red Bull Defiance, and we are super excited to be once again hosting this high-profile event in one of the most beautiful areas of New Zealand. The support locally always astounds us from local stakeholders and landowners to adventure racers in general and the region itself is so inspiring to race through,” says Bates. Traditionally held in January, Red Bull Defiance has been moved to the end of March which Bates says creates greater flexibility for competitors and everyone involved. “Late March is a brilliant time of the year for adventure racing with reasonably settled weather and slightly cooler conditions. Red Bull Defiance will effectively be the last big hit out of the season for competitors and an excellent way to wrap up a big summer of training and competing.” “It also allows for greater recovery time for multi-sporters competing at Coast to Coast who want to race both events. It lays down the challenge to see who is tough enough to take on New Zealand’s two largest adventure racing weekends and is an easier time of year for volunteers who want to be part of this massive community sporting event.” New to the event for 2020 is the introduction of a solo X1 race category that will appeal to those wanting to race as individuals. “This is a first for Red Bull Defiance and not usually an option in adventure races worldwide,” say Bates. “The new X1 solo category will attract some of the more elite and professional athletes keen to win the trophy for fastest female or male and I expect it to be very popular.” As an official Red Bull event, Red Bull Defiance delivers substantial media coverage and integration across Red Bull’s extensive global media channels. Lake Wanaka Tourism GM James Helmore says it’s an important event on the calendar, showcasing the appeal of the Wanaka region for multisport and active outdoor adventures. “The team behind Red Bull Defiance have put a lot of time and thought into making some exciting changes to the two-day adventure race which I’m sure will be positive for the ongoing longevity of the event and we are looking forward to Wanaka hosting it in 2020.” Red Bull Defiance will be hotly contested with solo’s and teams of two battling it out for line honours and X4 teams competing in a relay style race around the spectacular high mountain course. Bates says there is more news to come on Red Bull Defiance course developments. “We also have some exciting new additions to the Red Bull Defiance course that will soon be unveiled. The official Red Bull Defiance website will be launched in July with entries opening on the 1 st August so watch this space.”'

The Chakachamna River: A New Alaskan Classic

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

The Chakachamna River embodies everything that draws Brendan and Parker to Alaska: the massive whitewater, the history of exploration, the abundance of wildlife and the challenges that come with paddling remote rivers. Motivated by the failings of
'The Chakachamna River embodies everything that draws Brendan and Parker to Alaska: the massive whitewater, the history of exploration, the abundance of wildlife and the challenges that come with paddling remote rivers. Motivated by the failings of former paddlers decades ago, but encouraged by local bush pilot Jay Mahan’s multiple descents, they set out to explore the ‘unrunnable’ Chakachamna River and attempt to paddle across Cook Inlet.'

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

The Back Country Story – 21 years and counting History How to carry everything in a pack needed for a full-on extended back country adventure, without compromising nutrition? This was the question posed by the military and outdoor enthusiasts back
'The Back Country Story – 21 years and counting History How to carry everything in a pack needed for a full-on extended back country adventure, without compromising nutrition? This was the question posed by the military and outdoor enthusiasts back in 1950s NZ that ultimately led to the creation of Back Country Cuisine. Back country camp site Back then light-weight outdoors gear didn’t exist; everything was heavy. So, from the 1960s onwards the focus went on reducing the weight of outdoors gear, which is where the Back Country Cuisine story starts with The Alliance Freezing Company (Southland) Limited freeze-drying Beef. In the 1960s Alliance pioneered the development of freeze-drying food in New Zealand to reduce its weight and extend its shelf life, supplying products to adventurers like Sir Peter Blake for Lion New Zealand’s, “Round the World” yacht race and the army. Pudding in the bush By the 1990s The Alliance Freezing Company had changed its ownership structure to be a cooperative, changed its name to the Alliance Group and re focused on core business. So Back Country Foods Ltd was established to take over the freeze-dried meal business founded by the Alliance Freezing Company. This was in 1998 when Arthur and Shirley Ballantyne and Invest South purchased the freeze-dried food business from Alliance Freezing Company. Invest South is a Southland private equity fund, 100% owned by Community Trust South. Invest South provided equity capital to assist Arthur and Shirley to buy the business from Alliance and Back Country Foods Ltd was formed. Invest South saw opportunity to add value to a local business that was clearly focussed on growth. The business was relocated to Otepuni Avenue, Invercargill and the iconic Back Country Cuisine brand was created. Invercargill is at the bottom of New Zealand and is one of the southernmost cities in the world, with great access to some of the best wilderness areas in NZ – Catlins, Stewart Island/Rakiura and Fiordland. Many raw ingredients, including meat and vegetables, are produced by food processors in Invercargill. The region is something of a gourmet food box. With amazing world class food producers on their doorstep Back Country Foods have always been proud to source locally as much as possible to go into their Back Country Cuisine meals. Sunset in the mountains Like most new business ventures nothing is plain sailing and difficulties were experienced in the early days. While Invest South’s initial investment was passive it soon provided management support in the form of skilled directors with governance and systems to assist the company with its growth objectives. Some of Arthur’s file notes show his appreciation of the support and advice from some pretty good mentors. Invest South showed patience in assisting the business to realise its objectives. In 2009 Invest South facilitated a succession plan which enabled Arthur and Shirley to exit the business and bring in new shareholders Brent and Kara Crossan to join the company. The new shareholders were focused on market growth, particularly in the export markets. A gluten free Berry Smoothie on the go In 2013 Invest South facilitated the funding for a new large freeze dryer that delivered a step change in production capacity and generated efficiencies to enable the growth strategies. In early 2017 Brent and Kara for personal reasons wished to exit the company, so Invest South acquired a 100% shareholding, putting in place a management team to support the company through a transition period and to underpin future growth. Invest South has recently sold Back Country Foods to Invercargill-based family business George Wilson Group. George Wilson Group is a well-established Invercargill-based family business with more than 65 years’ experience in engineering, farm machinery, and more recently, campervan hire. Group director Murray Wilson says Back Country Foods presents an excellent new opportunity to diversify their Southland operations by growing an already successful business. “We are very excited about the potential of Back Country Foods, a strong and profitable business with a high-value brand that is extremely well positioned for growth and expansion into new markets. Our vision is very much focused on realising that potential, developing new products and exploring new markets whilst continuing to contribute to the Southland region’s economy and community.” Back Country Foods is very excited about the future with George Wilson Group.   Products So, what’s so great about Back Country Cuisine and who’s been eating the half a million meals, desserts and smoothies Back Country produce every year? Dinner time Back Country Cuisine products are light-weight, easy to prepare and taste great because of their unique freeze-drying process. This combines quick-to-hydrate, freeze dried vegetables and meats with delicious sauce mixes that retain their natural flavours. The result is tasty freeze-dried meals that can be prepared inside the pack in 10 to 15 minutes with just adding a bit of boiling water. During the freeze-drying process, crystals of frozen ice in the food are sublimed (evaporated) to water vapour in a vacuum chamber. The result is a completely dry product that does not shrink during the drying process. After packing, the food is heat-sealed in foil pouches from which all the air has been removed and replaced with nitrogen gas, keeping the food safe and flavoursome for at least four years. When prepared for eating, the water is quickly absorbed by the pores left by the ice crystals to give a juicy, tender food product. Back Country Cuisine meals are formulated to meet the high energy needs of outdoor activity and our products have a careful mix of the essential components needed for a healthy diet. This includes balanced carbohydrates and sugars for instant energy, protein to replenish exhausted muscles and oils and fats to keep you feeling full. Back Country Foods General Manager, John McGrath says that Back Country Cuisine meals provide outdoor adventurers with not only less pack weight and nutrition, but they provide a connection to home while they’re out in some of the toughest environments in the world. From crossing deserts, oceans or climbing mountains in pursuit of game or the summit. “We produce in excess of 500,000 meals a year, with Roast Lamb & Vegetables being our best seller every year. It’s a really classic Kiwi dish that’s as popular with both hikers and hunters alike here, Australia and South Africa. It’s also amazing how many international adventurers also try our meals while visiting New Zealand or adventuring with Kiwi’s abroad. It never ceases to amaze me where our meals get taken – climbing in Nepal, Oman Desert marathons, Kayaking the Tasman to sailing around the world and hunting in Kazakhstan. We then get requests from all around the world for our meals.” Back Country Cuisine Roast Lamb & Vegetables   The Future To help celebrate Back Country Cuisine’s 21st birthday this year, they’ve decided it’s time to give their meal bags/pouches a new look. Their new design is clean, simple and designed to retain and enhance their New Zealand heritage. Green from native bush and orange from track markers is now combined with a sunset mountain scape, including clouds or a lake depending on how you perceive it. They’ve kept the same range category colour scheme to make finding and buying your favourite meals easy – dark green for meals, light green for breakfasts and desserts and blue for meal complements. Over winter and beyond Back Country tell us they’ll be working on improving their labelling to increase legibility, improve bag tear lines and provide an on-bag water measuring system, which we think will be a great addition! So, with 21 years of experience, world-wide demand, great looking new packaging, a new owner and new meals being developed the future looks very bright for Back Country. If you would like to know more check out backcountrycuisine.co.nz'

Edge LYT 130

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

$899 LEVEL  Advanced FLEX     110/100 SIZES    250 – 305 SHELL  PU LAST    C 2100cc The NEXO LYT 130 are the perfect boots for performance skiers. The New Graphene material with infused plastic combined with the New Smart Frame shell delivers
'$899 LEVEL  Advanced FLEX     110/100 SIZES    250 – 305 SHELL  PU LAST    C 2100cc The NEXO LYT 130 are the perfect boots for performance skiers. The New Graphene material with infused plastic combined with the New Smart Frame shell delivers perfect balance between performance, comfort, and lightweight design. With the new Smart Frame Shell the boot has a more reactive flex and rebound. Moreover, the shell provides a smooth, progressive and dynamic feeling. The Perfect fit 3D Evo Custom with High Performance Collar ensures performance oriented customization. 3D Perfect Fit Liner: pre-shaped, thermoformable ankle pockets, provide an anatomical and comfortable fit. The 4 micro-adjustable Superleggera buckles are easy to handle and reliable. Duo Flex enables precise ski control through all phases of your turns. www.headsnow.co.nz'

Women’s Advant Edge 95 W

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

$649 LEVEL      Advanced FLEX         95/85 SIZES        250-305 SHELL    PU/SL LAST        C 2100cc The allride Advant Edge 95 W for advanced skiers delivers all-out adaptability in a comfortable performance driven boot. Its core feature is our
'$649 LEVEL      Advanced FLEX         95/85 SIZES        250-305 SHELL    PU/SL LAST        C 2100cc The allride Advant Edge 95 W for advanced skiers delivers all-out adaptability in a comfortable performance driven boot. Its core feature is our revolutionary Advant Edge design, which provides direct skier to ski power transfer, supreme balance and control through turns and enhanced customisation, rear support and energy transmission for better skiing with less effort. It also features women specific calf fit adaptability and a flex that can be set from comfortable to athletic. www.headsnow.co.nz'

Nexo LYT 130

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

$1199 LEVEL  Professional FLEX     130/120 SIZES    250 – 305 SHELL  GRILFLEX LAST    S 1850cc Power Efficient Design combines the New Smart Frame Shell with Evo stance for a high level of performance. The revolutionary Liquid Fit Technology
'$1199 LEVEL  Professional FLEX     130/120 SIZES    250 – 305 SHELL  GRILFLEX LAST    S 1850cc Power Efficient Design combines the New Smart Frame Shell with Evo stance for a high level of performance. The revolutionary Liquid Fit Technology provides you with the maximum level of comfort and fit. The customisation process is fast, easy and can be done anytime. Moreover, to improve comfort you have more space in the toe box. With Duo Flex, you experience precise ski control through all levels of your turns. www.headsnow.co.nz'

Raptor 120S RS

Extreme Sports Adventure Magazine

$949 LEVEL      Professional FLEX        120/110 SIZES       220 – 305 SHELL     PU LAST       RS 1800cc Designed for aspiring race rebels but with superlative comfort the Worldcup inspired Raptor 120S RS knows only one speed – FAST! Sporting race
'$949 LEVEL      Professional FLEX        120/110 SIZES       220 – 305 SHELL     PU LAST       RS 1800cc Designed for aspiring race rebels but with superlative comfort the Worldcup inspired Raptor 120S RS knows only one speed – FAST! Sporting race adapted fit and performance and a raft of customisable features, including flex tuning, HeatFit Pro liner and micro-adjustable SpineTech buckles the Raptor is super charged to go fast at the highest level! www.headsnow.co.nz'